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An Experimental Trial Exploring the Impact of Continuous Transdermal Alcohol Monitoring Upon Alcohol Consumption in a Cohort of Male Students

Examines the impact of continuous transdermal alcohol monitoring upon alcohol consumption in male students at a Scottish university.

By Fergus G. Neville (a), Damien J. Williams (a), Christine A. Goodall, Jeffrey S. Murer, Peter D. Donnelly

  • (a) School of Medicine, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, United Kingdom
  • (b) Department of Oral Surgery, University of Glasgow Dental School, Glasgow, United Kingdom
  • (c) School of International Relations, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife, United Kingdom

Predictors of Detection of Alcohol Use Episodes Using a Transdermal Alcohol Sensor

The objective of this investigation was to establish the ability of SCRAM CAM to detect different levels of self-reported alcohol consumption, and to determine whether gender and body mass index, alcohol dependence, bracelet version, and age of bracelet influenced detection of alcohol use. Researchers concluded SCRAM CAM is very good at detecting 5 or more drinks; performance of the monitor below this level was better among women because of their higher transdermal alcohol concentration levels.

By Nancy P. Barnett - Brown University, E. B. Meade - University of Delaware, and Tiffany R. Glynn - Brown University

Use of Continuous Transdermal Alcohol Monitoring During a Contingency Management Procedure to Reduce Excessive Alcohol Use

This study examined the effectiveness of using transdermal alcohol monitoring as a continuous measure of alcohol use to implement financial contingencies to reduce heavy drinking. Researchers concluded that transdermal alcohol monitoring can be used to implement contingency management programs to reduce excessive alcohol consumption.

By Donald M. Dougherty (a), Nathalie Hill-Kapturczak (a), Yuanyuan Liang (b), Tara E. Karns (a), Sharon E. Cates (a), Sarah L. Lake (a), Jillian Mullen (a), John D. Roache (a)

  • (a) Psychiatry Department, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, NRLC MC 7793, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA
  • (b) Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, NRLC MC 7793, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA